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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in 1919. the eraser law allows miners to remove content or information. other states are considering similar bills. and in the u.s. senate ed markey has reintroduced his federal legislation called "the do not track kids" act. not everyone is on board. critics say while the purpose of the law is ai is is admirable. but it's not the right approach. it's collecting more data on children just to comply. how will this delete button help kids, and should adults be allowed to erase their online indiscretions as well? >> we are go to amber where she specializes in technology policy. and emma, director of the free expression project. and joy spencer joins us from the digital center for democracy. and katie is assistant edit of slate who has been critical of eraser laws. meg, explain the thought process behind laws like the one we just saw get signed in california. why are these types of laws being proposed? >> things that we are seeing, a general fear, of this permanent record, we're all creating these permanent records, and for adults that starts at an age where there is a level of understan
took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exis
earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. new details on what lead to that deadly plane crash in new york. the commuter train was traveling far too fast, more than 80 miles an hour down the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >> welcome back. we're talking about the pope francis effect and how the new pope is making waves and the globe
. offs young student, in law school, inspired by nelson mandela, we took up the cause of a free south africa push for diff versement. led to sanctions be passed not there p when he visited harlem, and new york, it was a tour other in the united states to say the people that were supported the freedom movement and supported his freedom, as he was free, it was the beginning of that transition to democracy. sympathy and prayers to his family, to the people of south africa for an incredible life, an inspirational life. a great man, a giant. >> thank you for taking the time to join us tonight, we appreciate it. >> thank you for having me. >> alli standing by, i have learn add lot about nelson mandela tonight, but i have learned a lot about you as well, and your background. >> yeah. >> talk a little bit about that. >> yes, my family went to south africa at the turn of the the last my great grandfather and gandhi were good friends. they decided to build a school, and asked my great grandfather if my grandfather who was his son could go to the school. ten my grandfather was gandhi's youngest
to see why. >> gaining traction with other law enforcement agencies. we came across more than the bad guys. >> it's amazing what you could see. here are my two daughters. hey, you guys. what are you doing? >> shopping. >> do you want to say hi? they're going or if they were related to anyone who did. this was a great story, there's a pilot program under way, where there's six veteran new york city taxi drivers driving electric vehicles. it's a cool story. imagine a new york city with a taxi fleet dominated by electric vehicles. now imagine the year. is it 2030. 2050. how about 1899. that's right. in 1899 there were close to 100 battery powered taxis on the streets of new york. that same year one of the electric cabs earnt the nation's first speeding violation for barrelling down lexing tonne avenue. 114 years later, electric taxis are back. the city is rolling out six fully nissan cars for a year-long test run. >> this is where i run in. >> he is an owner operator, driving for 17 years. he's a test driver. >> something new, that's never been tested. i wanted to be a part of it. so th
spearheaded events to get mandela released from prison. and finally, human rights activist and law student originally from south africa. all right, kevin, let's get right into this. we've been reading the legacy. we're reading the headlines. peace icon. but this is the same mandela who in 1961 spearheaded the guerrilla warfare training, who in 1965 was arrested for sabotage. should we recognize him as a radical, and should he be celebrated at such? >> what people forget there is such a thing as history. and people were involved with crushing rebellions, crushing movements all around the world. it was not just this revolution and fight against colonialism in south africa. people forget the belgium government aid in the assassination. and if you talk about a movement to fight colonialism, nelson mandela was the leader, spirit of the nation. it was about fighting for freedom against a minority government. a white minority government that kept its power by any means necessary. so as a young man nelson mande mandela, founders of the anc, were revolutionaries. it was by any means necessary. i th
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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